Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is a weekly columnist and senior writer for The American Prospect. He also writes for the Plum Line blog at The Washington Post and The Week and is the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Is Joe Biden the Wrong Man at the Wrong Time?

In early 2015, it seemed obvious to most political observers ( including me ) that Jeb Bush was the most likely Republican presidential nominee. He may not have been heart-stoppingly charismatic, but he was raising lots of money, had extensive support within the party, and was just the kind of safe, established figure Republicans usually nominate. And who was going to beat him— a pipsqueak like Scott Walker or Marco Rubio? Not too likely. Yet his campaign sputtered and faltered, even before Donald Trump entered the race and made clear what Republican voters were really looking for. One of the lessons is that in presidential politics, you can never tell what a candidate has in them until they jump into the rushing river of the race. There is nothing quite like running for president. It challenges you in ways no other endeavor can, not even running for another major office: your stamina, your fortitude, your ability to think on your feet, your capacity to deal with crises, your...

There's Almost Nothing Donald Trump Won't Do to Get Re-Elected

The two and a half years since Donald Trump became president of the United States have been horrifying, terrifying, appalling, and maddening. But you haven’t seen anything yet. According to some reports , Trump himself was as surprised as everyone else when he won the 2016 election, but as we look toward 2020 the stakes are different. He knows full well that if he is defeated next November, he will forever be known as the one thing he most fears being: a loser. Even apart from the very real possibility that he could be prosecuted for any number of crimes from tax evasion to obstruction of justice, being rejected by the public and cast out of office would be one defeat he couldn’t spin or bluster his way out of. How far do you think Trump will go to avoid that outcome? Let’s begin with the most extraordinary news of the past week, that the president of the United States made a public invitation to any foreign power, hostile or otherwise, to meddle in the 2020 election...

The Man Who Liberated the Republican Party

Amid the daily horrors emanating from the White House, one symbolically important one may have missed your notice. Donald Trump recently decided to bestow the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Arthur Laffer, perhaps the single most discredited economist in America. Here’s how the proclamation described him: Arthur B. Laffer, the “Father of Supply-Side Economics,” is one of the most influential economists in American history. He is renowned for his economic theory, the “Laffer Curve,” which establishes the strong incentive effects of lower tax rates that spur investment, production, jobs, wages, economic growth, and tax compliance. That’s basically true, if you define “renowned” as “notorious” and “establishes” as “misleadingly asserts.” But about Laffer’s influence there is no doubt. For his service to the Republican Party, he certainly deserves any award the GOP can offer. Because what he really...

Why 2020 Is Starting to Feel Like 2004

On March 15, 2003, Governor Howard Dean of Vermont, at the time a decidedly second-tier presidential candidate, took the stage at the convention of the California Democratic Party. The first thing he said, to a thunderous cheer, was this: “What I want to know is what in the world so many Democrats are doing supporting the president's unilateral intervention in Iraq.” He then ran through a litany of his party’s failures to stand up to George W. Bush and the GOP, and finished with a rhetorical flourish that instantly made him a serious contender: “I’m Howard Dean, and I’m here to represent the Democratic wing of the Democratic Party.” While Dean didn’t win the nomination, his candidacy shone a bright light on the way Democrats had become timid and fearful, always worrying that if they were too clear in their criticism of the war or the administration that the public would reject them. More important, he showed how disgusted so many in the...

Nihilist-in-Chief

Last week, the House Intelligence Committee released transcripts of testimony by Michael Cohen, former personal attorney to Donald Trump and current guest of the Federal Bureau of Prisons. In it, Cohen describes how one of his tasks as an employee of the future president was to stiff people who had done work for the Trump Organization, on his boss’ personal instruction. “Some of the things that I did was reach out to individuals, whether it's law firms or small businesses, and renegotiate contracts after the job was already done, or basically tell them that we just weren't paying at all, or make them offers of, say, 20 cents on the dollar,” he said. Cohen expressed remorse for his involvement in this combination of scam and strongarming, saying that as a result of Trump’s refusal to pay people who didn’t have the wherewithal to fight a wealthy developer, “many of these folks, you know, lost everything.” That Trump did business this way is not...

Pages